My-day, my-day

Getting up and going to work today..

Keio Plaza, Tokyo

Diana, Diana..

Only you see the world as I see it..

Dreaming of an escape

Misaki Koh (pinhole)

Misaki Koh, Tokyo (Japan). November 2014.

 

Lena, artist.

Oslo, September 2014.

Holga, Holga…

….

Pinhole N.Y.

New York, last week.

Industrial nonsense (pinhole)

Oslo fjord (pinhole)

Home sweet home

Alone

Pinhole.

COWS (pinhole)

Dolomites, Italy. July 2014.

Lunch

Lunch on carpets, and Tri-X. Badakhshan, Afghanistan. May 2014.

Salaam, Afghanistan

17th May 2014. While Norway celebrates the 200 year anniversary of their constitution, I’m heading for the remote Badakhshan, north east of Afghanistan, for the third time.

There, no constitutional paper grants each and every citizen equal rights, as a base for justice and prosperity. There, natural hazards alone cost hundreds of lives every year. Just 10 days ago, a massive landslide buried half a village and between 2000 and 2700 people, over a third of whom children. A few thousand more have been forced to leave their houses of clay, maybe forever. The disaster in Badakhshan made international headlines for 2 – 3 days and now is gone, forgotten.

IMG_1215

For images and stories from my previous trips to Afghanistan, see the Documentary section above.

Bipolar

When everything of you is split, and even your shadow has a dark and a bright side.

IMG_3376

Iran

Boundary line

There is a boundary line between what a photographer feels should be documented, shown or told, and what he feels should remain private.

These two photos below are from a project I just did about that boundary line, about the boundary between life and death.

And these are the only two photos from that project that will ever be displayed on this blog. The other photos need to mature. They may never see the light or may one day be shown in a more appropriate way than on a blog.

If you want to share a thought on where your boundary line goes, as a photographer, or about these shots I shared, please feel free to comment.

Forest of thoughts (pinhole)

Unclear tangle of plants, and thoughts. Kodak Tri-X and modified Sharan pinhole camera, as usual.

By the fjord (pinhole)

February 2014, Trondheim’s fjord, central Norway (probably the first snow free winter in Norwegian history). Kodak Tri-X in modified Sharan pinhole camera.

Johnnie stalker

Sharan pinhole camera, Kodak Tri-X.

jan14046-5-2

House (pinhole)

Faceless city

Oslo. Half a million people, but no one to communicate with. What are you all afraid of? Why don’t you show your face? Why is it so that the tighter we people are packed, the greater the distance between us? Nothing else in nature behaves like that. We are a paradox, an exception, a monster.

Well, fine, keep hiding, and reveal your real selves only for your beloved, as long as you have some. Then we’ll see.

I’ll go back to yet another sleepless night in yet another shabby hotel room. The faces on TV aren’t any faker than the ones in the street, anyway.

A pigeon’s point of view (pinhole)

Irkutsk, Siberia, November 2013. Sharan pinhole camera & Tri-X.

31.12.13

Trondheim 31.12.13. Tri-X.

Friends on new year’s eve

Kodak Tri-X in Rodinal 1:50. Shaken, not stirred.

Dust stars

No, not star dust spelled wrong. Just stars created by dust on a negative. Tri-X.

Milan, pinhole

Milan, Italy, 19.12.2013. Modified Sharan pinhole camera & Kodak Tri-X.

Emilia, Italy (pinhole)

Countryside near Ferrara, Italy, 18.12.2013. Sharan pinhole camera, Tri-X 400.

Minimalism

Snow.

” ? “

Tokyo, 23rd November 2013.

Trans-Siberian IV: Encounters

Fellow passengers, strangers met in the street, encounters that lasted minutes, hours, few days at the most. Regardless, encounters that made my day and my journey. Here are some of them.

Trans-Siberian III: Train of thoughts

Since I was a child, I’ve always had a tremendous fascination for trains and stations.

We used to travel between the south and the north of Italy a couple of times a year, usually on a night train that would take almost 12 hours. Each and every evening during the weeks prior to our travels, my brother and I spent hours fantasizing about the coming adventure. We could recall details of each station from our previous travels. The lights, the signs, the technical stuff along the tracks, everything had a mysterious charm. When the night of our train adventure came, we couldn’t sleep a minute. Instead, we stood in the aisle and admired the night passing by and becoming a new day. Even the thought of the typical smell of the stations still gives me the goosebumps.

I guess that has something to do with my love for trains. No train journey is too long. And the Trans-Siberian is surely worth repeating.

Trans-Siberian II: Slow motion

9289 km on a train are and definitely feel like a huge distance. Landscapes pass by like in slow motion. Repetitive and monotonous yet ever changing. Days become nights, and the nights days.

Trans-Siberian I: pinhole

First post of a coming series from my Trans-Siberian journey. This with a few pinhole shots.

Why I do this? It’s the closest I get to producing suggestive images from nothing. If I could draw, I’d use charcoal. But I can’t, so I use Tri-X.

Røros (pinhole)

Røros. Norway, 30.11.2013. Home made pinhole camera & Kodak Tri-X (1 – 4 sec exposures, handheld camera).

See you

The geese and I share an inextinguishable, almost compulsory need to cover great distances, never settling down completely, commuting between opposite corners of the world.

These days they’re flying southwards. In 36 hours, I’ll be heading eastwards, leaving for THE train journey. See you.

“O”

War

Street art, Oslo, 30.10.2013

Carousel

Copenhagen, 25.10.2013.

Manicure

Copenhagen, 25.10.2013. Kodak Tri-X.

Grenoble 8.10.2013

08.10.2013

Fog (pinhole)

Norway, September 2013. Sharan pinhole camera & Kodak Tri-X.

Grave visit (pinhole)

Lom, Norway. Tri-X 400.

“Image saving error”

No pixels, no SD cards, no batteries, no auto-focus lenses, no manual focus lenses. No lenses and no focusing at all.

The camera: a cardboard box. The “lens”: a 0.16mm pinhole on the front of the box. The shutter: a removable piece of cardboard covering the pinhole. And off you go: pinhole photography, where each exposure needs seconds in bright light, minutes in low light. A pain in the ass, you may say.

The truth is there is little as rewarding as creating a photo literally from scratch, from building your camera, to judging your exposure times, to developing your film.

In pinhole photography, it’s just the technique’s weaknesses and even your mistakes that result in rewarding and fascinating images. This is a double exposure I got at the end of the last roll: film couldn’t advance enough for a regular new exposure and the very last one partly overlapped the previous. An image saving error, if you will.

Pinhole roll n.I – Trondheim

First roll of Tri-X 400 exposed through a paper-made pinhole camera bought in Tokyo.

All images were shot handheld, in some cases holding the camera against walls or so. Exposure times of 1 – 5 seconds.

Sofia’s love for pigeons

Bologna, Italy. T-Max 400 developed in Rodinal. Scanned, uncropped.

Mourn

Young owls. Kodak TMax 100.

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